Art + Environment

Arnhembrand, Art + Environment

Arnhembrand Update 1

 

Arnhembrand: Living on Healthy Country is a new art, science and story project which Mandy Martin and David Leece scoped at the invitation of the community with the Djelk Rangers in Maningrida, Arnhem Land, in March 2015.

 Photo by David Leece

Photo by David Leece

We firstly thanked the Traditional Owners for permission to visit Country and acknowledged the elders past and present. We then presented some models of how Arnhembrand would work with community participation on art and stories about environmental preservation. This would raise awareness both nationally and internationally of the work the Indigenous communities living in the Djelk and Warddeken Indigenous Protected Areas in Arnhem Land undertake to preserve their culture and environment. The Arnhembrand project is designed to support the Karrkad-Kanjdji Trust which is working in the long term to achieve these preservation objectives. Arnhembrand aims to create a multi-disciplined and participatory project following the successful model of the Paruku Project. We presented examples of possible outputs including a book, a DVD, a website, blogs, an archive and exhibitions. We were then invited to meet with artists and artist/rangers at the The Wíwa Project which is hosting Arnhembrand in Maningrida. We presented our ideas in more depth and showed examples of ideas and techniques for drawing, painting and digital art that we could experiment with to foster a new wave of contemporary art which builds on each individual artist's distinct style while extending their traditional practice. The new wave art and new media created will assist in raising awareness of the environmental issues the Djelk and Warrdeken communities deal with.


Drawing workshop with The Wíwa Project 


Digital Art with The Wíwa Project 

Natalie Carey, Coordinator of Wiwa Media Unit, Mathias Cameron, Wiwa artist, Alexander Boynes, artist, Sirus Rostron, Wiwa artist, Hugo Sharp photographer/ Videographer. Photo Mandy Martin

"Dreaming Story" by Alexander Boynes


Drawing with Babbarra Designs

Arnhembrand also worked with Babbarra Designs who work out of The Women’s Centre and the women experimented with making new wave drawings about feral animals and weeds in their community. The chance to experiment will inspire new designs and approaches to making art while contributing to the environmental goals of the Djelk Rangers and the community.


Kabulwarnymyo

Arnhembrand has also been invited to work with a fourth group of artists at Kabulwarnymyo, in May 2015. We will offer some exploratory drawing with new media and digital media to the descendants of the famous artist, Lofty Bardayal Nadjamerrek “Wamud Namok” who lived and worked at Kabulwarnymyo . Arnhembrand aims to provide opportunities for Wamud Namok’s descendants to build on his legacy and further develop their own art and income opportunities.

Photo by Hugo Sharp

Arnhembrand: Living on Healthy Country will inject energy through experimentation with new wave art and media and produce new material for performance and exhibition which take as their content living on healthy Country. This will also contribute to the Djelk and Warrdeken archives of stories and recordings and will generate income through external exhibition and media opportunities.

Desert Channels, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

The Big Wet; Art , Science and History collaborate in the Desert Channels Country

The Big Wet: Art, Science and History collaborate in Desert Channels Country

 

 

To celebrate the launch of the CSIRO book, "Desert Channels. The Impulse to Conserve" Mike Smith chaired a forum at the National Museum of Australia on 22 October 2010. The panel was comprised of one of Australia's best known artists, Mandy Martin, together with historian Libby Robin, zoologist Chris Dickman and Guy Fitzhardinge, deputy chair of Desert Channels Queensland. They explored the impulse to protect the country where Australia’s desert rivers rise. At a time when Lake Eyre is filling fast, and biodiversity is booming, they discussed conservation partnerships in Desert Channels Country and displayed new art and writing about the region.

Desert Channels, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Desert Channels. The Impulse to Conserve launched

There were 17 contributors to "Desert Channels. The Impulse to Conserve" at the very successful launch at the Hugh Sawrey gallery, Stockmans Hall of Fame in Longreach, swelling the large crowd to 95-100 people. We sold 30 or so books on the night and did quite a few media releases for radio and newspaper. http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2010/09/27/3023188.htm

http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2010/09/27/3023188.htm?site=westqld

and links from ABC Western Qld http://www.abc.net.au/westqld and http://www.abc.net.au/northwest

Tropical storms are still rolling around the Desert Channels and Simon and Christine Campbell were cut off by the raging Barcoo River! Nella and Mark Lithgow did make it through from Cravens Peak Reserve, as fortunately did Bruce and Maureen Scott from Windorah and Angus and Karen Emmott from Stonehenge, everyone's vehicles were well plastered with mud though! 10 of us went on and stayed at Noonbah, near Stonehenge with Karen and Angus Emmott on Saturday, to watch the grandfinal of course with pies and beer provided by Faye Alexander. Due to the road being closed, we changed plans and didn't stay with Simon and Christine at Blackall so 8 of us then descended on Maureen and Bruce Scott for the night at Moothadella, Windorah and were able to celebrate with Bob Morrish who joined us for the night also.

Dave Thompson's welcome to country at the SHOF was excellent and people thought the powerpoint he presented, including early, hauntingly damning Hansard records of politicians views of Aboriginal people and counter-visual evidence of long occupation of Country,  was powerfully informative. Bruce Scott's opening speech was moving and very much to the point revealing his great love of the Channel Country. He bestowed great honour on the contributors by comparing our quest to write about and make images of the Channel Country with the aims of the celebrated writings of Alice Duncan Kemp. I hope to send you all his text in due course. It was great to see the intercanges in the crowd during the night and a good mob of about 35 went onto dinner after. where the discussions continued.

The launch at the Rain on the Rangelands conference in Bourke on Monday night was also a big event, 230 participants were seated  right on the banks of the old wharf on Bourke and we were given a 20 minute time slot for our launch which put is in full spot light. Geoff Wise was enthusiastic and generous in his speech, I was able to introduce Chris Dickman as the NSW Scientist of the year and once Chris and I had recovered from the shock of talking to such a big crowd, were kept busy signing books for some time after the speeches and when I saw Melinda Chandler from CSIRO last,the following day, shortly after Guy Fitzhardinge's challenging keynote address, she was still selling. Half of the print run has been sold already, it seems, so don't delay your contributor discounted purchases too long into the future!

I'm sorry you couldn't all be there to celebrate this significant achievement but we hope to catch up with more of you at "The Big Wet" National Museum Forum on 22 October 12-2 pm, which will launch the book in another context.

Desert Channels, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Desert Channels. The Impulse to Conserve. Book launch and Exhibition

You are invited to experience an exhibition of new art and writing about and by the people of the Desert Channels Country.Please join some of the 46 contributors at the launch by

Bruce Scott, Mayor of the Barcoo Shire.

Hugh Sawrey Gallery, Australian Stockman’s Hall of Fame, Longreach, Queensland 6.00– 8.00 pm 24 September 2010 Event Free Please RSVP September 17 aldr.martin@bigpond.com

WEBSITE: http://environmentalhistory-au-nz.org/desert-channels/ To order: http://www.publish.csiro.au/nid/21/pid/6406.htm

Kimberley Artists, Mangkaja Arts, Painting Country, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Mangkaja Residency 2010 Part 1

Mandy Martin, Mangkaja Residency, June 2010  

This is fourth year I have painted Gooniyandi Country with artists from Muludja and particularly the Cherel family. Everyone seemed to want to come, we had 13 people painting in all, excluding Henry Surprise who took photos for me, and I arrived early after the short drive over the Fitzroy River from Fossil Downs to pick people up. June Davis and Mervyn Street brought their own 4WD, with Travis Leonard driving and Rohnanna Cherel, Jai Cherel, Henry Surprise, Fabian Davis, Tessie Cherabun, Bronwyn Malo and Jane and Ann Halloway all climbing in as well. I took Isaac, Edna and Katrina Cherel along with me for the 2 ½ hour drive out to Painted Rocks on Fossil Downs. We met up with the group of visitors who had been at Fossil Downs Station owner, John Henwood’s 70th birthday in Broome, for smoko and demolished a few slabs of John’s birthday cake made in the shape of a grader and with thick yellow and black icing. The reunion was emotional, Merrilee MacDonald, Fossil Downs descendent, is a fluent Gooniyandi/ Giya speaker. Henry Surprise and Mervyn Street were also pleased to see their old Fossil Downs stockman friends, Bill O’ Dougherty and Peter Gray.

Some of the younger people hadn’t visited Painted Rocks or as Gooniyandi Cherel, named them, Imanara, and spent a long time exploring the site.

The men were very excited to point out the holes where in the old days, they stored their bush tucker to keep it cool and away from predators.

The rock art is ancient and most significant and it was moving to hear a group of people at the site all talking in their own tongue with great respect and excitement.

After exploring the rock paintings and rock markings, we moved back a kilometre or so to a site Mervyn had chosen as we had approached earlier in the morning, everyone set up and painted for some hours except Henry Surprise who took photos for us.

At the end of the afternoon we all went fishing at a nearby spring and the women pulled in perch and bream with out effort it seemed, then cooked them immediately.

The dying hours of the day were spent trying to change a flat tyre, a long and difficult job requiring some real bush skills, we all got home a few hours later than planned. Issac Cherel was just able to show us the red sand, the only for many kilometres around, where the Rainbow Serpent had gone into the ground, before darkness fell.

Kimberley Artists, Mangkaja Arts, Painting Country, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Mangkaja Residency 2010 Part 1

Mandy Martin, Mangkaja Residency, June 2010  

This is fourth year I have painted Gooniyandi Country with artists from Muludja and particularly the Cherel family. Everyone seemed to want to come, we had 13 people painting in all, excluding Henry Surprise who took photos for me, and I arrived early after the short drive over the Fitzroy River from Fossil Downs to pick people up. June Davis and Mervyn Street brought their own 4WD, with Travis Leonard driving and Rohnanna Cherel, Jai Cherel, Henry Surprise, Fabian Davis, Tessie Cherabun, Bronwyn Malo and Jane and Ann Halloway all climbing in as well. I took Isaac, Edna and Katrina Cherel along with me for the 2 ½ hour drive out to Painted Rocks on Fossil Downs. We met up with the group of visitors who had been at Fossil Downs Station owner, John Henwood’s 70th birthday in Broome, for smoko and demolished a few slabs of John’s birthday cake made in the shape of a grader and with thick yellow and black icing. The reunion was emotional, Merrilee MacDonald, Fossil Downs descendent, is a fluent Gooniyandi/ Giya speaker. Henry Surprise and Mervyn Street were also pleased to see their old Fossil Downs stockman friends, Bill O’ Dougherty and Peter Gray.

Some of the younger people hadn’t visited Painted Rocks or as Gooniyandi Cherel, named them, Imanara, and spent a long time exploring the site.

The men were very excited to point out the holes where in the old days, they stored their bush tucker to keep it cool and away from predators.

The rock art is ancient and most significant and it was moving to hear a group of people at the site all talking in their own tongue with great respect and excitement.

After exploring the rock paintings and rock markings, we moved back a kilometre or so to a site Mervyn had chosen as we had approached earlier in the morning, everyone set up and painted for some hours except Henry Surprise who took photos for us.

At the end of the afternoon we all went fishing at a nearby spring and the women pulled in perch and bream with out effort it seemed, then cooked them immediately.

The dying hours of the day were spent trying to change a flat tyre, a long and difficult job requiring some real bush skills, we all got home a few hours later than planned. Issac Cherel was just able to show us the red sand, the only for many kilometres around, where the Rainbow Serpent had gone into the ground, before darkness fell.

Kimberley Artists, Mangkaja Arts, Painting Country, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Mangkaja Residency 2010 Part 2

Mandy Martin, Mangkaja Arts Residency, Fitzroy Crossing, June 2010 This brief residency with artists at the Mangkaja Arts Centre was to consolidate and expand painting in Country with the artists who last year spoke to me about wanting to follow through ideas with me which had grown out of the very successful exhibition at Australian Galleries, Melbourne, November- December 2009.  The full colour catalogue, DVD film and the exhibition had pleased them all and it was important to follow up both from my point of view and from that of the artists. We were all really happy to be able to work together. They all without exception chose the trips into Country as a way of passing on knowledge about Country to their family and me.

I focussed on 3 outstanding artists, Daisy Andrews, John Prince Siddon and Mervyn Street who have all made a quantum leap in their painting since I last worked with them. Along the way I worked with quite a few other artists including Jack Macale, Daisy Andrews son, and 13 artists from Muludja community.

Site 1: Brooklyn Springs, Knununberri

We had two trips to this well known site which Daisy identified as Big Waluk, meaning trees and rock, on the Leopold Road near Daisy Andrew’s husband’s country, Jandamarra. Daisy used to camp here with her husband and everyone met here for ceremonies.

Daisy’s nephew, John Prince Siddon came with us the first trip

Daisy's close kin, Jack Macale a Jandamarra man, came the second time. He is an art award winning artist and cultural guide for his home community, Biridu and he said they bring visitors here first for the smoking ceremony.

The school bus, driven by another of Daisy’s close kin, stopped on the way home from Fitzroy Crossing to Biridu and collected Jack Macale, (back left) and Daisy asked me to photograph her with her family.

The kids all were intrigued with my painting kit!

My final day at Mangkaja I found time to work with John Nargoodah and family on the back verandah at Mangkaja this year because of John’s other work commitments. His daughter, showed great talent in her first even canvas!

Kimberley Artists, Mangkaja Arts, Painting Country, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Mangkaja Residency 2010 Part 2

Mandy Martin, Mangkaja Arts Residency, Fitzroy Crossing, June 2010 This brief residency with artists at the Mangkaja Arts Centre was to consolidate and expand painting in Country with the artists who last year spoke to me about wanting to follow through ideas with me which had grown out of the very successful exhibition at Australian Galleries, Melbourne, November- December 2009.  The full colour catalogue, DVD film and the exhibition had pleased them all and it was important to follow up both from my point of view and from that of the artists. We were all really happy to be able to work together. They all without exception chose the trips into Country as a way of passing on knowledge about Country to their family and me.

I focussed on 3 outstanding artists, Daisy Andrews, John Prince Siddon and Mervyn Street who have all made a quantum leap in their painting since I last worked with them. Along the way I worked with quite a few other artists including Jack Macale, Daisy Andrews son, and 13 artists from Muludja community.

Site 1: Brooklyn Springs, Knununberri

We had two trips to this well known site which Daisy identified as Big Waluk, meaning trees and rock, on the Leopold Road near Daisy Andrew’s husband’s country, Jandamarra. Daisy used to camp here with her husband and everyone met here for ceremonies.

Daisy’s nephew, John Prince Siddon came with us the first trip

Daisy's close kin, Jack Macale a Jandamarra man, came the second time. He is an art award winning artist and cultural guide for his home community, Biridu and he said they bring visitors here first for the smoking ceremony.

The school bus, driven by another of Daisy’s close kin, stopped on the way home from Fitzroy Crossing to Biridu and collected Jack Macale, (back left) and Daisy asked me to photograph her with her family.

The kids all were intrigued with my painting kit!

My final day at Mangkaja I found time to work with John Nargoodah and family on the back verandah at Mangkaja this year because of John’s other work commitments. His daughter, showed great talent in her first even canvas!

Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Part 3; Bogged at Boolcoomatta

The third stage of our trip in April was to Bush Heritage Australia’s Boolcoomatta Reserve which lies about 100 kms west of Broken Hill in South Australia. www.bushheritage.org.au It is a jewel of a property in great condition and wonderful for watching birds, emus and euros. There was a large gathering of BHA staff, board members, volunteers and supporters for the weekend. As usual I slipped straight off outside or to the nearest hill to sketch when ever I could and spent two days out an historic copper mine site, painting another 6 panel work. Faye ducked off to the dump per usual and collected some old steel radial wire and fabricated 2 beautiful semi spherical vessel shapes over the visit.

Rain showers were moving across the vast chenopod landscape and once again I had to move canvases and sketches under cover and into the 4WD every time if got too damp. It was disconcerting to see the landscape so verdant and when I painted up at the mine, even the mullock heaps were tinged green from the copper and the red ochre soils were littered with many green mineral fragments lying around. This required quite a modification in my usual palette.

I largely completed a 6 panel work on paper, later finished in the studio.

I distinguished myself by getting well and truly bogged on the way to the mine site and had to use the personal satellite beacon, EPNRB, all visitors are required to use when not at the base and within an hour, two staff had arrived and pulled me out. I was mortified of course especially as all the rest of the group were waiting in vehicles to visit a site.

Anzac morning was freezing and clear and the more intrepid of the group climbed to the top of a hill where the last post was sounded apparently somewhat in advance but otherwise formalities were observed.

We drove back to NSW the day after Anzac day through tough mulga country around Cobar, stripped bare by a goat invasion, then struck locust swarms again as we headed further south. Our part of the world in central NSW looks much drier and the ground cover worse by far than most of the “desert” country we travelled though in South Australia, with the exception of Cobar. However the streets are being paved in gold there, well massive pavers of shiny polished granite in pink and black anyway, the minerals boom is rampant right through the outback it seems no matter where we travel.

Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Part 3; Bogged at Boolcoomatta

The third stage of our trip in April was to Bush Heritage Australia’s Boolcoomatta Reserve which lies about 100 kms west of Broken Hill in South Australia. www.bushheritage.org.au It is a jewel of a property in great condition and wonderful for watching birds, emus and euros. There was a large gathering of BHA staff, board members, volunteers and supporters for the weekend. As usual I slipped straight off outside or to the nearest hill to sketch when ever I could and spent two days out an historic copper mine site, painting another 6 panel work. Faye ducked off to the dump per usual and collected some old steel radial wire and fabricated 2 beautiful semi spherical vessel shapes over the visit.

Rain showers were moving across the vast chenopod landscape and once again I had to move canvases and sketches under cover and into the 4WD every time if got too damp. It was disconcerting to see the landscape so verdant and when I painted up at the mine, even the mullock heaps were tinged green from the copper and the red ochre soils were littered with many green mineral fragments lying around. This required quite a modification in my usual palette.

I largely completed a 6 panel work on paper, later finished in the studio.

I distinguished myself by getting well and truly bogged on the way to the mine site and had to use the personal satellite beacon, EPNRB, all visitors are required to use when not at the base and within an hour, two staff had arrived and pulled me out. I was mortified of course especially as all the rest of the group were waiting in vehicles to visit a site.

Anzac morning was freezing and clear and the more intrepid of the group climbed to the top of a hill where the last post was sounded apparently somewhat in advance but otherwise formalities were observed.

We drove back to NSW the day after Anzac day through tough mulga country around Cobar, stripped bare by a goat invasion, then struck locust swarms again as we headed further south. Our part of the world in central NSW looks much drier and the ground cover worse by far than most of the “desert” country we travelled though in South Australia, with the exception of Cobar. However the streets are being paved in gold there, well massive pavers of shiny polished granite in pink and black anyway, the minerals boom is rampant right through the outback it seems no matter where we travel.

General, Art + Environment

Desert Trip 2010, part 2; Flash flood Italowie Gorge

After our excellent time at Kalamurina Reserve, see Part 1, we drove down the Birdsville Track through pretty slippery and tricky conditions, a rare event to see rain on the track which forced back motorbike riders and the 4WD club it seems and stopped in the late afternoon at the iconic Ochre pits just north of Copley. They are a significant and protected Heritage indigenous site and contrasts starkly with the Coal mining activities within kilometres distance.

The colour of the pits in the rain was stunning and everyone was impressed with just how extensive the site is. As we headed south to Leigh Creek we realised the 5 inches of rain through there the day before had caused significant road damage and closures. The road east to the Gammon Ranges and Arkaroola was open though and we drove in the late afternoon up the gorge over creeks showing clear evidence of big flash floods. We found a beautiful spot to camp under some mallee which were silhouetted dramatically by the moon and looked beautiful when I sketched them at sunrise with the red morning light glowing on their glossy trunks. It was a really chilly night because we were higher and the ground was saturated from the rain but at least there were less mozzies.

We drove through the dramatic Italowie Gorge which has ancient river red gums growing in the sandy wide creek beds. Leigh Creek and Italowie creeks still had pools of water and running water in places. We stopped at Iga Warta, www.igawarta.com which also has extensive ochre pits and chatted with the Aboriginal managers there about their Adnyamathanha culture and people. After that welcome coffee break we came across an unfortunate traveller who hadn’t heeded a council detour (or safe speed given the cheery wave he gave us a few hours before when he passed us) and had ended up with his 4WD more than half submerged in water. I grabbed the chance to make a sketch while Guy and Steve performed the heroics of winching him out of the water. It was very tricky and involved the poor man, with a personalised number plate,“Rodge”, having to duck down underwater to attach the winch in pretty freezing water. We hope he still isn’t sitting on the bank where we left him dripping, waiting for it all to dry out. His camera gear, GPS and mobile phone all seemed ruined with water and according to Guy, his food was all floating around the back seat of the car from the fridge. We located his travelling companions later that  day at Arkaroola and they went to his ultimate rescue.

I have wanted to go to the Gammons and Arkaroola all my life and was really happy to see them at last, we only had a long afternoon at Arkaroola in the end, after repairing a tyre and chasing Rodge’s mates but it was just enough to cook up some curry and make a sketch at Arkaroola waterhole which looked stunning in afternoon light. We sat in the shade and saw Yellow footed rock wallabies nimbly hopping about the escarpment and rocks.

We were pleased to escape the numerous 4WD’s and dust and head down the fringe of Lake Frome to a creek bed camp outside the National Park. The distant view of the rain shadow side of the Flinders Ranges was magnificent at dawn and the river red gums, just massive. I managed to sketch everything before the flies became too persistent and then we headed out of that wonderful part of the world further east.

General, Art + Environment

Desert trip 2010. Part 1, Flood in Tirari Desert

A small group including Guy Fitzhardinge, Faye Alexander, Steve Morton and Australian Wildlife Conservancy operations manager, Tony Fleming and myself visited Kalamurina, an exceptional Australian Wildlife Conservancy reserve in the Tirari Desert, South Australia in April.  www.australianwildlife.orgThe big rains in Queensland have gradually flowed down the desert river systems in massive volume to now flood the Warburton, Kallakoopah and Macumba Rivers. Kalamurina fronts over 160 kms of the Warburton and this reserve, more than the size of Tasmania, reaches all the way from the Simpson Desert down to Lake Eyre. The flood peak is just reaching the Warburton groove above Lake Eyre and the eastern part of the lake is flooded.

We camped for 5 days on the Warburton, and despite our worst fears the mozzies and the flies weren’t too bad, our major problem, mainly for my paper canvases and sketch book pages, were huge storm cells moving across the wide horizons and we had 5 mls of rain overnight one night. The Birdsville track was cut above Mungerane and briefly closed again below it after up to 5 inches of rain fell near Leigh Creek.

This rain and flood waters made driving around the property tricky and a simple trip 200 kms to turn off a tap at a bore took 10 hours one day. I fortunately know what days like this can be like and spent a long day painting by the Warburton. I made an experimental 3 panel study bringing together the expanding and massive coal mining operations at Leigh Creek with the Warburton in flood. The following days I painted a 3 panel study of the Warburton River in flood!

Fellow artist, Faye Alexander, works in recycled materials and was able to collect some wire and pieces from the dump at Kalamurina to make some work. Guy, Steve and Tony did some avid birdwatching and poked about the camp fire, telling yarns and cooking the camp oven!

The property managers Tessa and Mark McClaren were terrific hosts and Mark took us down the Warburton in a dinghy one afternoon. The experience was more like being in Arnhemland in the wet with water horizon to horizon reflecting light through the half submerged coolabah and also big storms shafting light down through rain. The birdlife is wonderful and Mark turned to engine off so we could drift and just appreciate the silence and birds. A beautiful red dingo howled and sniffed along the bank near us when we landed on shore for a walk.

Trevor Wright from Wright Air flew up from William Creek and took the 4 of us for a 2 hour flight in a circuit over the 3 rivers in flood, the Warburton, Kallacoopah and Macumba rivers, then over the Warburton groove and the top part of Lake Eyre.

Everyone says it is a memorable experience and this certainly will be unforgettable. Flying at 300- 500 feet one loses one’s depth perception and it was often only when a flock of pelicans or camel hoof prints showed up in the river mud, that we were able to tell our actual height. The landscape is just immense and seeing it interspersed by misty rain, storm cells, shafts of light and huge cumulus clouds added a rare dimension and atmosphere to the flight.

General, Art + Environment

Literature in the Arid Zone

Tom Lynch has posted his chapter on Literature in the Arid Zone  (from the Cranston and Zeller book that is hard to get) online - it may be of interest to you. http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1081&context=englishfacpubs

STRATA: DESERTS PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE.

Strata: Deserts Past Present and Future. An Environmental Art Project About a Significant Place.

Martin, M., Robin, L., Smith, M.,Strata: Deserts Past Present and Future July 2005 Goanna Press, Canberra

This book is about diverse kinds of knowledge and ways of knowing place. Indigenous knowledge depends on country- country is the context for knowledge and the place where knowledge is significant. Western science, by contrast, typically differentiates between the knowing and the place- in many cases, it seeks knowledge systems, Indigenous, scientific and artistic - and by locating them in a common place we seek co- understanding, for valuing the different ways each of us sees a single place that is significant, but differently so, for each perspective.

There was an exhibition of art works from all the artists associated with Strata, curated by Tim Rollason, Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs, 18-24 July 2005.

Visit Fenner School of Environment and Society to read and download the publication.

General, Art + Environment

Literature in the Arid Zone

Tom Lynch has posted his chapter on Literature in the Arid Zone  (from the Cranston and Zeller book that is hard to get) online - it may be of interest to you. http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1081&context=englishfacpubs

STRATA: DESERTS PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE.

Strata: Deserts Past Present and Future. An Environmental Art Project About a Significant Place.

Martin, M., Robin, L., Smith, M.,Strata: Deserts Past Present and Future July 2005 Goanna Press, Canberra

This book is about diverse kinds of knowledge and ways of knowing place. Indigenous knowledge depends on country- country is the context for knowledge and the place where knowledge is significant. Western science, by contrast, typically differentiates between the knowing and the place- in many cases, it seeks knowledge systems, Indigenous, scientific and artistic - and by locating them in a common place we seek co- understanding, for valuing the different ways each of us sees a single place that is significant, but differently so, for each perspective.

There was an exhibition of art works from all the artists associated with Strata, curated by Tim Rollason, Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs, 18-24 July 2005.

Visit Fenner School of Environment and Society to read and download the publication.

Desert Channels, Kimberley Artists, Mangkaja Arts, Painting Country, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Mandy Martin and Mangkaja Artists Painting Fitzroy River Valley 2009

Mandy Martin and Mangkaja Artists Painting Fitzroy River Valley Country 2007-2009 Imanara, Painting Fitzroy Valley Country

Smith St Room catalogue